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DS9 2-15

DS9 2x15
"Paradise"

Original airdate: 2/13/1994
Rewatch date: 7/3/2013


Sisko and O'Brien get trapped in a human colony in which most of their technology doesn't work.

Spoiler-free notes:

And, sigh, it's yet another episode that starts with a human colony being where humans are not supposed to be. How long before somebody stumbles across a human colony in the Gamma Quadrant?

This is the third O'Brien-heavy episode in a row. The Chief is getting a lot of attention.

They've clearly fallen into a cult devoted to the appeal to nature fallacy.

When Kira and Dax are trying to catch the rogue runabout, Dax once again resorts to a human metaphor, meaning this is the second time two aliens with their own cultures to draw from rely on human culture to figure out what to do. Lazy.

Sisko shows off some serious balls, as he is essentially being tortured and refusing to break.

Why did Alixus erase the Rio Grande logs if she intended to send it into the sun?

Alixus' insistence that Sisko remove his uniform and accept his new role reminds me of Kivas Fajo doing the same thing with Data in "The Most Toys."

Why does Miles seem surprised to discover the source of the duonetic field? It seems pretty damn obvious by that point that Alixus created it.

Sisko and O'Brien leaving without making sure everybody agrees with the sentiment that they want to stay behind--and without bothering to rescue the children from a life of hardship and medical neglect--seems horribly immoral and wrong.

This is a decent episode about the mentality that can create a cult like the one Alixus has built, and the downer ending in which the group seems perfectly content to go on living under their crazy communal philosophy is the only logical conclusion to this sort of thing. It's a good subject for DS9 to explore, because when it comes to cults, there is never a happy ending or an easy moral solution.





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